• D.C.
  • BXL
  • Lagos
  • Dubai
  • Beijing
  • SG
rotating globe
  • D.C.
  • BXL
  • Lagos
Semafor Logo
  • Dubai
  • Beijing
  • SG


Updated Jun 14, 2024, 10:17am EDT
politicsNorth America
icon

Semafor Signals

Democrats are trying to get Republicans ‘on the record’ over reproductive rights

Insights from The Guardian, NPR, and Letters from an American Substack

Arrow Down
Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer pushed for the IVF bill vote.
Nathan Howard/Reuters
PostEmailWhatsapp
Title icon

The News

Senate Republicans blocked a Democratic bill aimed at protecting IVF, raising fresh questions about the future of the treatment in the US. The move also marked the latest in a series of votes concerning reproductive rights, which analysts say the Democratic Party is using to draw attention to their position vis-a-vis that of their rivals ahead of November’s presidential election.

The debate around IVF began heating up earlier this year, when the Alabama Supreme Court ruled that in vitro embryos are children. On Wednesday, the GOP introduced its own, narrower IVF proposal, saying the Democratic one went too far.

AD
icon

SIGNALS

Semafor Signals: Global insights on today's biggest stories.

Democrats are forcing the GOP to vote on popular procedures

Source icon
Sources:  
The Guardian, CNN, Politico

Democrats have made clear that they are getting Republicans to oppose popular infertility treatments “on the record,” as part of a strategy to bolster consensus ahead of the November election, The Guardian wrote. They used the tactic last week by pushing a vote to recognize women’s right to contraception nationwide, which similarly failed. Republicans have dismissed the efforts as “political games” by the Democrats; Sen. Josh Hawley told Politico he wasn’t worried about playing into their messaging tactic.

Most Americans support IVF, complicating Republican messaging

Source icon
Sources:  
NPR, Gallup, Letters from an American Substack

While Republicans have long argued that life begins at conception, IVF complicates their position, NPR wrote. More than 80% of Americans think IVF is “morally acceptable,” a recent Gallup poll found, posing a dilemma for Republicans: Voting to protect IVF will anger their base of white Evangelical Christians who demand legal recognition for “fetal parenthood,” and voting to end it will infuriate the vast majority of Americans who support it, argued Heather Cox Richardson, author of the Letters from an American Substack. Many GOP leaders have been vocal in their support of IVF, further muddying the party’s messaging.

The 2024 presidential election could be ‘the most consequential’ one for reproductive rights

Source icon
Sources:  
PBS NewsHour, Semafor, Associated Press, The Wall Street Journal

The US presidential election could provide the first opportunity post Roe v. Wade to see how a second Trump presidency could limit abortion nationally, legal historian Mary Ziegler told PBS NewsHour, likely making it “the most consequential election” for reproductive rights in half a century. The latest US Supreme Court ruling upholding access to a widely-used abortion pill underscored the stakes of the 2024 election,” the Associated Press wrote. A recent Wall Street Journal poll found that abortion was the “make-or-break” voting issue for 39% of suburban women in swing states.

Semafor Logo
AD