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Updated Jan 24, 2024, 11:15am EST
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How world media is viewing Trump’s decisive New Hampshire win

With insights from the BBC, The Sydney Morning Herald, and The Times of India

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A man watches television as major news organisations project that Republican presidential candidate and former U.S. President Donald Trump wins during the New Hampshire presidential primary election, at The Goat in Manchester, New Hampshire, U.S., January 23, 2024. REUTERS/Reba Saldanha
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The News

Former U.S. President Donald Trump won the New Hampshire GOP primary on Tuesday, edging out rival Nikki Haley and stepping closer to securing the Republican nomination for November’s presidential election.

Here’s how global media are reporting on Trump’s victory.

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Haley faces uphill battle against Trump, despite hefty campaign funding

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BBC

New Hampshire offered the best opportunity for Haley to slow Trump’s march towards the Republican nomination, the BBC’s North America correspondent Anthony Zurcher wrote. She faces stiff odds, and her chances are now further deteriorating with Trump’s win Tuesday night. Haley polled well among college graduates — but that wasn’t enough to push her ahead in the state, Zurcher noted. “She spent tens of millions of dollars [in New Hampshire] and had the endorsement of the state’s popular Republican governor, but New Hampshire’s independent voters and large proportion of college graduates were not enough to deliver victory,” he noted.

Republican party is Trump’s, outcome shows

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The Sydney Morning Herald

Trump’s latest primary win displayed the grip the former president has over his party, The Sydney Morning Herald’s Farrah Tomazin wrote. New Hampshire “was meant to be [Haley’s] best chance of an upset due to its large number of independent and moderate voters,” Tomazin noted, but Trump came top despite facing 91 criminal charges. Haley, who took 44% of the vote, is maintaining that “the race is far from over” but the Trump camp is using the result to say she ought to now drop out of the race.

Primaries are a ‘farcical’ exercise in US

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The Times of India

The primary contest means U.S. elections last for months at a time, a process “confusing even to Americans,” political columnist Chidanand Rajghatta wrote for the Times of India. Internal party politics are governed by “bizarre make-up-as-you-go rules,” he noted, and are a “farcical exercise.” While Haley lost to Trump Tuesday evening, her performance was better than expected — and that was enough to keep her in the race, at least in the short term, Rajghatta wrote. As the primary process stretches on, Haley’s camp is hoping Trump will “self-destruct” or be bogged down by his numerous legal issues.

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